About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CNN 8
CSPAN 6
CSPAN2 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
WETA 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
libya since the operation was launched 24 hours ago. >> u.s. joint chiefs of staff chairman mike mullen says most of gadhafi's air defense systems and airfields have been taken out. libyan ground forces have also been hit. >> the no-fly zone is effectively in place. we have combat air patrol or aircraft over benghazi and we will have them there for on a 24/7 basis. move that to the west and he hasn't flown any aircraft for the last two days. the whole goal here is to get it in place. two, be in a position so that he is unable to massacre his own civilians and that we effect the humanitarian support. from that standpoint, the initial operations have been very effective. >> besides the u.s. britain and france countries taking part in the libyan operation include italy, spain, canada, and qatr. >> gadhafi vowed to fight back what he calls terrorists attacking his country. >> we be victorious. we will achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. have you the devil on your side. >> he called coalition nation it is new nazis and promised a, quote, long drawn war. >> nic rob
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
from south korea. u.s. military ships are delivering food and relief supplies and a british rescue team is scheduled to arrive on sunday with heavy lifting equipment and 150 rescue experts and search dogs from virginia and california are on their way to japan to help right now. >>> a few people have tested positive for radiation exposure according to a report on japanese public television. they were near a nuclear facility when something inside the plant exploded shortly after the earthquake. government officials say the reactor itself was not damaged. >>> and hawaii is moving to get federal funds to help rebuild in the aftermath of the tsunami. it struck the hawaiian islands early yesterday morning, sweeping maui's coast with six-foot waves, causing millions of dollars in damage. and hawaii's governor signed a state of disaster proclamation today. >>> and in california, governor jerry brown has declared a state of emergency in four counties. in crescent city, waves topped eight feet. in northern california, one man was killed when he was swept out to sea while taking pictures of the ts
likely is it will you jump out of your parent's income group? the u.s. did surprisingly poorly coming in behind denmark, norway, sweden, germany, france, canada. two other such studies confirmed this reality. now, i know what my perception is about america. anyone can make it here, and there are lots of high-profile examples of that. but those are anecdotes. the facts say that for the average joe in recent years social mobility has slowed and other countries have moved ahead. similarly among rich countries over the last 25 years our growth rate per person has not been the strongest. now there are clearly places where we are still number one and the number of guns we own far exceeds any other country. we account for 50% of the world's annual production of weapons. we are number one in terms of our total debt to other countries, but there are really many positive places where we are still number one. that's what i began by listing. but my point is the picture today is a lot more mixed than boastful rhetoric about america is number one suggests. the question i have really is what would i
between the u.s. and japan on this over exactly how much danger really exists. charles? >> okay. stan grant joining us from tokyo. many thanks to you updating us on the situation there, the operation to bring the things under control at the fukushima daiichi plant. thanks again. poly? >> charles, the financial fallout continues to follow the nuclear reactor problems. today the japanese yen hit the strongest level against the dollar. that was one dollar to 76.54 yen which surpassed the previous high of 79.75 in '95. it since pulled back and is right now trading at around 79.11 to one u.s. dollar. now a super strong yen is a very big issue. exporters want a weaker yen. you see it there still at 79. it has still surpassed that 80-en ma80 0 yen mark. japanese companies sell most of their products overseas. when they bring the overseas earnings back home and convert them into yen, a weaker yen means they make more in profits. now i want to show you what's been happening this entire week since monday, march 14th. now the lower the line, the stronger the yen is to the dollar. and it's been g
and the point ready gaining against the u.s. dollar.the dolldollar. the dollar falling against the japanese yen. >> the waenger yen helped give japanese stocks a boost. the nikkei in tokyo is up. most of the major markets have finished the session higher. in shanghai, the market rose after new manufacturing data showed there may not be a need for any immediate tightening measures. two straight surveys showed china's manufacturing growth slowed in february but still remained at a healthy level. beijing's official purchasing managers index slipped slightly to 52.2 last month. that's down from 52.9 in january. >>> and hsbc's february pmi reading fell to a seven-month low of 51.7, down from 54.5 in january. any figure above 50 signals growth. >>> well, shares of hspc fell more than 5% in hong kong trade as asia got its first chance to react to the company's full-year earnings. the company's results were released after the close on monday. its profit more than doubled from the previous year to $13.2 billion. but, here's the key, it's still missed expectations. it's pre-tax profit came in at $19 bill
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
. >> thank you. britain says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victory, denouncing what he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for controleastee been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention would not
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
. >> i think it's also an issue for journal education. i think at least in the u.s., almost 2/3 of students in journalist school are female. >> primarily female? >> i think to some extent, it's a matter of giving them the training and incentive and also for female faculty to mentor young journalist students so they have in their head the idea that maybe they can do that. also going back to barbara's issue about skills or confidence. i think it takes a particular tenacity to be an investigative reporter. you have to be willing to stick with something to get your foot in the door. i had a student -- i used to teach investigative reporting as one the journalism courses that i taught. and my most aggressive student was a female. and even on the story assignment for class, she found out this guy wasn't going to give her an interview. she found out what time they came to work, and she was there to meet him at 7 a.m. when she arrived. she interviewed him outside of the door of his office building because he wouldn't give her an interview. i think it takes a certain amount. it can sta
be a solution, a fair solution on the palestinian issue. i think... with the u.s. saying whether it was going to have this hijacked or not, whether it's hijacked or not, one thing that is, i think, irreversible is that there is going to be a free press in all these countries. that is irreversible. and that... whatever the government says, that free press is going to demand a better implementation of agreement between israel and the arab countries. i understand that israel is buying egyptian guards cheaper than the egyptian consumer and 40% cheaper than the jordanians. i don't think the egyptians would like to... >> rose: well, there have also been stories that people in gaza were paying a lot more for things that came from israel than the people of israel were paying for them. >> well, that's inside israel, inside the occupation. but the egyptians are going to say how come we sell our goods to a neighbor-- no matter how friendly they are-- than to another neighbor, jordan, or to ourselves. that's very difficult to justify. >> would you speculate that it's more likely that freely-elected leade
, both before and after the u.s.-led invasion of 2001. and from 1991 to 1993 he was the foreign minister of algeria. he is currently a distinguished fellow at the london school of economics. he is one of the elders, a group of eminent global leaders brought together by nelson mandela to try to solve the world's problems-- or at least offer some advice. i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome back. >> thank you very much. it's good to be here. >> rose: so let's just start with the obvious. what kind of advice should you be offering and the group of elders about change in the middle east? >> you know, this change is definitely taking place. it is the work of the people of the region of the different countries. there is a lesson of humility there. nobody has predicted how and when it was going to happen. >> rose: or that it was. >> that it was going to happen. nor the order in which it's happening. so i think we... if we learn that lesson of humility, that's already a great contribution. the second thing is, you know, in places like tunisia and egypt they have been facing the
europe needs to stop being naive ought play needs to --. how big is that for the u.s.. >> following the list there's a strong sense. i give a lot of credit to our european partners. we don't have any illusions about where the european publics are and the skepticism they have about this. but it is a way forward to the political and military strategy and this is a price our partners have played a role in slovenia and bosnia offering troops for afghanistan. this is the kind of thing we look for and we see the countries in the western balkans showing the will and determination and understanding, to share the burden of responsibility. >> they thought there was a problem, they made a harsh siege. what in your view to contribute more to the military situation whenever there is one rather than -- jobs in the united states and think it can do judgment in development work? >> i don't think europe thinks that. a friend of mine and somebody i'd meet every month to talk about nato collaboration. he has a job worry about defense commitments. and looking at issues of finance and the european union
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
in the u.s. to congressmen and people on the left and right and journalists and think tanks and ordinary citizens and the same conclusion kept leaping out at me again and again. most americans do not realize how lucky they are you know, the political institution defined the country in many cases unique and almost all cases on usual. i'm talking about term limits, the recall mechanism, the citizens' initiative and referendum and states' rights and localism, open primaries, totally unique feature but ones that make the largest leaders answerable to the rest of us, and above all i'm talking about the direct election of almost everybody. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us, but it's these institutions growing organically growing out of the constitution that has served to keep your government more and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say there are cultural differences. we are naturally liberal people. we got away from the monarchies and the collapse is into the old world and so on. i'm afraid that explanation does not quite work. culture is and fr
elsewhere. elsewhere in europe and the u.s.. -- the east germany disparity comes from the fact that east german women, upon leaving high school, seek college in jobs elsewhere. this can be explained in other ways. that is the case for many european countries. i would not jump to it as causing anything quite frankly right now. >> given your work at u.s.a.i.d. and the issues around trafficking and looking at what are those disparities going to mean in some of these other dynamics we can agree are really important and once we would like to avoid. short of women, the importation and trafficking of women in terms of bringing in -- >> but look at where trafficking is occurring today. it is more associated with high- income countries -- japan and brides.rea to importwho import those countries do not have a disparity. what does it mean? i do not know what it means, but i think we have jump to conclusions quite a bit. maybe in the end it will pan out some kind of impact. it is a moral issue, and i think that is why people are attracted to it. we wanted to be a security issue, but i think it may n
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)